TheAngryMustard

July 22, 2014 at 10:45pm
10,912 notes
Reblogged from 4gifs

(via 4gifs)

10:39pm
119,350 notes
Reblogged from poyzn

poyzn:

Quick and simple lifehacks.

(via shutupswarley)

10:31pm
396,528 notes
Reblogged from deaf-cecil

transaervania:

next time you go to accuse a teenage girl of overreacting remember that when a bunch of elderly white men couldn’t agree on something, they shut down the government

(Source: deaf-cecil, via shutupswarley)

9:20pm
8,477 notes
Reblogged from reddlr-trees
6livevil6:

Awe god has identity issues. How cute.

6livevil6:

Awe god has identity issues. How cute.

(Source: reddlr-trees, via annrkist)

5:28pm
229,829 notes
Reblogged from buzzfeed

nashaawest:

hellojoeyyy:

Rosetta Stone

My heart broke into tiny pieces when I read the Rosetta Stone tweet.

(Source: bzfd.it, via do-not-ever-change-who-you-are)

5:25pm
13 notes
Reblogged from kacey-is-shape-shiftting

(Source: kacey-is-shape-shiftting, via annrkist)

5:23pm
2,391 notes
Reblogged from theartofanimation

theartofanimation:

Yuta Onoda

5:22pm
299 notes
Reblogged from anti-propaganda

(Source: anti-propaganda, via annrkist)

5:16pm
23,692 notes
Reblogged from azspot

And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.

— 

"Why Don’t the Unemployed Get Off Their Couches?" and Eight Other Critical Questions for Americans (via seriouslyamerica)

Don’t get me started.

(via tamorapierce)

(Source: azspot, via fuchsia-violet)

11:05am
39,654 notes
Reblogged from vemilys

All you need to know about Sansa in this book is that she has a direwolf – a giant, monstrous wolf, a half-mythological monster, a killing machine – and she names it Lady.

— 

Shmoop (via kissfistthat)

You’re goddamn right she did.

(via brainstatic)

(via curiousgeorgiana)

(Source: vemilys, via charlaface)